The FIFA World Cup Qatar will be held between November 20 and December 18. 32 teams are competing to win the title. Due to the high temperatures in Qatar during the summer, this will also mark the first time that the World Cup has been held in winter. However, the tournament has been subject to many controversies. There have been many reports about human rights violations, particularly the deaths of migrant workers as they built the infrastructure for this World Cup. 
Qatar is also deeply religious and bans alcohol, gambling and homosexuality. Qatar has allowed limited alcohol consumption in certain areas, which has helped to ease the ban on alcohol. Many LGBTQ supporters are concerned about their safety in Qatar because of the laws on homosexuality. 
While the World Cup chiefs tried to calm the fears of fans they also added caution to respect Qatar’s culture, which has sparked skepticism among fans. Many fans were further upset by the fact that Qatar banned sex toys as well as skimpy clothing.  
Here’s a list of banned things at the 2022 FIFA World Cup.

2022 FIFA World Cup – Banned Things 
Qatari authorities and FIFA were at odds over the sale of alcohol in Qatar. Budweiser, the American beverage giant, has been a major FIFA World Cup partner for years. This allowed them to sell beer at fan parks, in stadiums, and inside the stadiums. However, Qatar’s laws highly restrict its sale. Qatar finally allowed alcohol to be sold in Doha’s fan zones. Beer will be served only between 06:30 and 01:00 AM.
Beer was allowed to sold throughout the day at previous World Cups. Qatar has also introduced a ‘sin tax on alcohol which means a pint of beer could be sold for as high as € 20. However, alcohol can still be brought into the country illegally and will be confiscated at airports along with drugs and vapes.

Be prepared for expensive prices if you’re off to Qatar…
Beer 500ml – £11.60 🍺
Alcohol free beer 500ml – £7 ❌🍺❌
Water 500ml – £2.30 💧
😭 pic.twitter.com/vP2MLEkUL1
— Football Away Days (@FBAwayDays) November 13, 2022

Gambling is also forbidden in the country. The rise in popularity of online betting sites will allow fans the opportunity to place safe bets on matches beyond Qatar.
Qatar bans pornography. This means that fans will not be allowed to stream pornography or import it into Qatar. Qatar also prohibits the sale of sex toys. Public displays of affection could result in fans being arrested.

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The safety of homosexual fans attending the World Cup has been a concern. Qatar has made homosexuality a criminal offense. Fans could be sentenced to prison if they are found violating the norms. 
The country also bans skimpy clothing because it has laws that require that foreign women wear clothing that covers their shoulders as well as their knees. 
Because the meat is prohibited in Islamic countries, Middle Eastern food, primarily non-vegetarian pork will not be available. 

What have the officials actually said?
Qatari officials have assured that as long as fans respect the country’s traditions, they will come in no harm’s way. Qatar’s World Cup chief Nasser Al Khater has earlier said, “All we ask is for people to be respectful of the culture. At the end of the day, as long as you don’t do anything that harms other people, if you’re not destroying public property, as long as you’re behaving in a way that’s not harmful, then everybody’s welcome, and you have nothing to worry about”.
Major General Abdulaziz Abdullah Al Ansari of Qatar, one of the most senior Qatari officials, stated that homosexual fans are welcome. However, he warned against the excessive display of LGBTQ symbols within the stadium.
Al Ansari said, “If he (a fan) raised the rainbow flag and I took it from him, it’s not because I really want to, really, take it, to really insult him. Because if it’s not me, somebody else around him might attack (him) … I cannot guarantee the behaviour of the whole people. And I will tell him: ‘Please, no need to really raise that flag at this point.”




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